Tag Archives: Disease Management

Living with Diabetes: What Can I Eat?

Grains and Starchy Vegetables

If you are going to eat grains, choose whole grains. Whole grains are high in fiber. Foods high in fiber take longer to digest and therefore affect your blood glucose more slowly (i.e. whole wheat bread, prunes and other vegetables). Reading food labels can help you with making the best choice.

What is a Whole Grain?

A whole grain is the entire grain—which includes the bran, germ and endosperm (starchy part). “Refined” flours like white and enriched wheat flour include only part of the grain. They are missing many of the nutrients found in whole wheat flour. Examples of whole grain wheat products include 100% whole wheat bread, pasta, tortillas, and crackers. For cereals, pick those with at least 3 grams of fiber per serving and less than 6 grams of sugar.

Best Choices of Starchy Vegetables

Starchy vegetables are great sources of vitamins, minerals and fiber. The best choices do not have added fats, sugar or sodium. Try a variety such as parsnip, plantain, potato, pumpkin, acorn squash, butternut squash, green peas, and corn.

Best Choices of Dried Beans, Legumes, Peas and Lentils

Try to include dried beans into several meals per week. They are a great source of protein and are loaded with fiber, vitamins and minerals. Examples include dried beans (such as black, lima, and pinto), lentils, dried peas (such as black-eyed and split), fat-free refried beans, and vegetarian baked beans.

What you need to know about Cholesterol

LDL (Bad) Cholesterol

LDL cholesterol is called “bad” cholesterol. Think of it as less desirable or even lousy cholesterol, because it contributes to fatty buildups in arteries (atherosclerosis). Plaque buildup narrows arteries and raise the risk for heart attack, stroke and peripheral artery disease.

HDL (Good) Cholesterol

HDL cholesterol is “good” cholesterol. Think of it as the “healthy” cholesterol, so higher levels are better. HDL acts as a scavenger, carrying LDL cholesterol away from the arteries and back to the liver, where it can be broken down and passed from the body.

A healthy HDL cholesterol level may protect against heart attack and stroke. Low levels of HDL cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease. HDL cholesterol does not completely eliminate LDL cholesterol. Only 1/4 to 1/3 of blood cholesterol is carried by HDL.

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body; they store excess energy from your diet. A high triglyceride level combined with low HDL cholesterol or high LDL cholesterol is linked with fatty buildups in artery walls. This increases the risk of heart attack and stroke.

 

 

The Medical Associates Department of Internal Medicine provides a Fellowship-trained Endocrinologist, who specializes in diabetes, thyroid disease, and osteoporosis. The staff also includes two certified diabetes educators with board certifications in advanced diabetes management. They see patients for diabetes education appointments and medication. Call 563-584-3310 to schedule an appointment.

Source: www.diabetes.org