Tag Archives: Prediabetes

Heart Health for the Entire Family

As the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, heart disease is commonly discussed with the older, adult population. However, the conditions that lead to heart disease are happening at younger ages causing heart disease to develop in younger adults increasingly more often. Heart care and prevention is important for everyone. Being aware of what causes heart disease, while also developing heart healthy habits with your family, are both great forms of defense.

What can you do to take control?

Make heart-healthy choices in your diet. Diets high in trans-fat, saturated fat, and added sugar increase the risk for heart disease. Sodium (or salt) increases blood pressure, and most Americans eat too much of it, including children. Pay attention to the nutrition labels on food packaging. A food’s sodium content is something that is clearly listed. By replacing foods high in sodium with fresh fruits and vegetables, you can help lower your blood pressure. In fact, only 1 in 10 adults is getting enough fruits and vegetables each day.

Other helpful ideas to use with children include focusing on the quality of what your child is eating and that they eat until they are full. In other words, no clean-plate club. Quality over quantity. Remember to use kid-sized portions. A good rule to keep in mind is one tablespoon of food per age of the child for each meal option (about two or three foods). It’s also good to serve one meal for your entire family. Plan meals to include at least one thing that everyone likes. Try healthier options for celebrations, and instead of rewarding children with food, give verbal praise or hugs for good behavior. Finally, if you have some particularly picky eaters, get creative to make fruits and vegetables fun. Try using unsweetened raisins or small pieces of fruit to make faces on healthy foods.

Stay active. Physical activity helps keep the heart and blood vessels healthy. Yet, only 1 in 5 adults meets the physical activity guidelines of getting 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity. In fact, more than 1 in 3 American adults – and nearly 1 in 6 under the age of 18 is obese. Carrying around this extra weight puts stress on the heart. It can also contribute to more serious conditions like diabetes. This disease causes sugar to build up in the blood, causing damage to blood vessels and nerves that help control the heart muscle. Simply taking an evening walk as a family or playing an active game together in the back yard each night can help everyone meet their daily cardio goal.

Don’t smoke. Smoking damages blood vessels in our body and can cause heart disease. Despite the decades of health warnings, smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. More than 37 million U.S. adults currently smoke on a regular basis, and thousands of young people start smoking every day. If you don’t smoke – fabulous! Don’t start and be sure to talk with your older children about the dangers of smoking as well. If you do smoke, learn more about our smoking cessation services. Quitting smoking takes a lot of emotional energy and can be very stressful. Let our qualified staff help develop an individualized quitting plan.

Be consistent in managing any current health conditions. Millions of Americans (of all ages) have high blood pressure, and about half don’t have it under control. Having uncontrolled high blood pressure is one of the biggest risks for heart disease, as well as other harmful conditions including stroke. Work with your healthcare team to manage conditions such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Be honest and work together with your provider. Take medications as prescribed.

Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. By making some simple changes to your family diet and exercise habits, you can help keep your family on the heart-healthy track. Set attainable goals and try to be consistent. Modeling these behaviors will also help your kids form these great habits. When communities, health professionals, and families work together, living heart healthy is possible.

 

Medical Associates is proud to provide advanced heart care that’s close to home. All of our cardiologists are board certified and bring many years of exceptional cardiac care to the community, making it the most complete and up-to-date cardiology program in the Tri-State area. Medical Associates also offers the only cardiothoracic surgeons in the area, and we have the experience and expertise to perform a full array of complex surgeries and techniques. These departments work closely with Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology, and others to provide comprehensive medical management, diagnosis, and treatment of patients.

 

Sources:
cdc.gov/features/heartmonth
Heart.org
healthfinder.org
uwhealth.org

Prediabetes:  What you Need to Know

Prediabetes is a serious health condition in which an individual’s blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults – more than 1 out of 3 – have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

You can have prediabetes for years with no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include:

  • Being overweight
  • Being 45 years or older
  • Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Being physically active less than 3 days a week
  • Having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Having polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk.

Physical Activity
If you have prediabetes and are overweight, losing a small amount of weight and getting regular physical activity may help lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. A small amount of weight loss means around 5% to 7% of your body weight, just 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. Regular physical activity means spending at least 150 minutes a week of brisk walking or a similar activity. That’s just 30 minutes a day, five days a week.

What should I eat?
Nutrition is key to a healthy lifestyle when you have prediabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood sugar (or blood glucose level) in your target range. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all factors that can affect your blood sugar. A registered dietitian (RD) or certified diabetes educator (CDE) can help you create a meal plan that’s full of healthy-tasty options.The key is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. Some great food groups to include are:

  • Vegetables: Nonstarchy includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes. Starchy includes potatoes, squash, corn, and green peas.
  • Fruits: Includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes.
  • Grains: At least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains. Includes wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, and quinoa, bread, pasta, cereal, and tortillas.
  • Protein: Includes lean meat (chicken or turkey without the skin), fish, eggs, nuts and peanuts, dried beans and certain peas (such as chickpeas and split peas), and meat substitutes, such as tofu.
  • Dairy: nonfat or low fat milk or lactose-free milk (if you have lactose intolerance) yogurt, and cheese.

Use oils when cooking food instead of butter, cream, shortening, lard, or stick margarine. Oils with heart-healthy fats, mainly come from the following foods:

  • Oils that are liquid at room temperature, such as canola and olive
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Heart-healthy fish such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel
  • Avocado

There are also some foods that those with prediabetes should limit. Try to stay away from fried foods and other foods high in saturated fat and trans fat. Foods high in salt or sodium are also good to avoid. Cut back on sweets, such as baked goods, candy, and ice cream. It’s also wise to limit beverages with added sugars, such as juice, regular soda, and regular sports or energy drinks. Drink water instead of these and consider using a sugar substitute in your coffee or tea.

Your primary care provider will keep a close watch on your blood glucose levels, monitoring them to make sure that your prediabetes doesn’t become type 2 diabetes. You should discuss diet and exercise recommendations with your doctor. Be honest about your habits and work together with your doctor to better control your blood glucose levels.

 

 

Sources: www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/prediabetes.html and
www.niddk.nih.gov